Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Improve grading skills with this free DaVinci Resolve tutorial

Want to to improve your grading skills? Here's a great free tutorial on how to increase the perception of colour without resorting to the saturation slider.

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Colour grading is an art, and there are many different ways to achieve the same end aims. But when you want to improve grading skills, one of the most difficult things to do is to make the image more colourful. Often we simply reach for the saturation slider, but as you’ll discover, this isn’t always the best way. This new tutorial shows you how to achieve it another way.

Adjusting the saturation in an image is a blanket way to add more colour to your picture. You might be able to isolate objects and dial in more colour that way, but doing this has some severe limitations.

To begin with, the monitors and TVs we use are limited in the amount of colour saturation they can handle. Even the latest HDR displays and colour spaces have limits. It’s very difficult to make something that is clearly highly red even redder.

Yet you might be faced with a situation where an image clearly has colourful objects within it, but the image as a whole still looks desaturated. What do you do in this case?

How to create colour separation in DaVinci Resolve
A new tutorial by Mixing Light shows how to create colour separation within DaVinci Resolve. Image: Mixing Light.

Thankfully the human eye can be tricked, and for our brains perception is everything. It’s possible to grade an image by playing on our perceptions by introducing colour contrasts.

It’s a fact that humans perceive contrast very well indeed, so anything that displays it effectively is automatically interesting to our eyes. In a new free tutorial by the guys over at Mixing Light, colourist Cullen Kelly demonstrates how to create ‘colour separation’ in your grades using DaVinci Resolve.

It’s clever stuff, and a useful tool to have in your box if you are struggling with one of those client requests to ‘increase the colour’ on a difficult shot.

Head on over to the Mixing Light website to check it out!

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